Medical Education

Integrated Medical Sciences

Lectures and small-group learning deliver an integrated curriculum that connects the basic sciences to patient care.

Year 1

Integrated Medical Sciences I

BIOL3642 IMS-I Scientific Foundations of Medicine is an integrated cross-disciplinary course in the 1st semester of medical school that introduces the fundamental basic science principles relevant to the study of health, disease mechanisms and clinical medicine. The course consists of 6 blocks of core topics that incorporate foundational principles of molecular biology, cellular and metabolic biochemistry, nutritional science, cell physiology, inheritance patterns and mechanisms of genetic disorders, immunology, and introductory concepts in pharmacology and toxicology. Grounding in these scientific principles gives students insight into the biological complexity and genetic diversity that underlies disease processes. Course material builds sequentially upon prior knowledge and is closely integrated with the other IMS-I courses (including BIOL3644 Human Anatomy I, BIOL3643 Histology and BIOL3645 General Pathology) and with BIOL3640 Doctoring I, to maximize learning opportunities. The course format includes lectures, small group sessions, online asynchronous learning modules, patient presentations, and team-based learning sessions.

Assessment Methods Grade Composition
Exams (6 total) 100%
Attendance at TBL, small groups, and patient presentations Required

Objectives

SFM-Cell Physiology (CP)

1. Describe the fundamental mechanisms underlying the physiology of cells, tissues and organs.
2. Describe the mechanisms of cardiac, skeletal and smooth muscle contraction, function and regulation.
3. Explain the role of the autonomic nervous system in modifying physiological functions in the body.
4. Apply knowledge of physiological mechanisms and their regulation to explain clinical conditions.

SFM-Biochemistry (BC)

5. Describe the general structures of nucleic acids, mechanisms of DNA replication and repair, DNA transcription, and the synthesis of protein by translation of encoded mRNA sequences; list the cellular components, enzymes, and regulatory steps involved in each process.
6. Explain the principles of homeostasis, including physiologic acid-base balance and the bicarbonate buffer system, metabolic regulation and mechanisms of hormone actions.
7. Identify and describe the structural components of proteins and other metabolic compounds; describe their function and the basic catabolic and anabolic pathways by which each compound is metabolized, including key regulatory and enzymatic steps.
8. Describe the role of minerals in the maintenance of homeostatic balance and mediation of metabolic reactions in the skeleton.
9. Explain how intermediary metabolic pathways are integrated and regulated during states of feeding and fasting, starvation, disease and injury.
10. Describe the basic principles of bioenergetics, estimate energy yield and thermodynamic requirements, and describe the role of energy and nutrients including vitamins in metabolism within a cell.
11. Identify prototypic diseases in which DNA, RNA or protein structure is defective, and the resulting clinical consequences.
12. Deduce and explain how defects in metabolic pathways can result in disease, and identify and connect specific symptoms in clinical case presentations to metabolic disorders.
13. Explain the mechanisms by which cells communicate and the intercellular signal transduction pathways, including nuclear receptors and cell surface receptors, that promote a cellular or physiological change; give examples of how dysfunction in these processes contributes to human disease.
14. Describe the phases of the cell cycle and how it relates to DNA replication and repair mechanisms, and discuss how cell cycle dysregulation forms the biological basis for disorders in which cell proliferation is abnormal.
15. Describe the general principles, methods, and applications of PCR, Microarray and DNA sequencing for clinical and diagnostic applications.
16. Describe theories of aging and the biological, psychological, and social aspects of aging; and diseases of aging including types of dementia and other geriatric syndromes.

SFM-Biochemistry/Nutrition (BN)

17. Define calorie, basal metabolic rate, respiratory quotient, and daily energy expenditure, and describe how these values are measured or calculated.
18. Define and describe the role of vitamins, and list examples of essential, conditional and non-essential nutrients.
19. Identify the nutritional (lifestyle) causes of obesity-related disorders such as type II diabetes and metabolic syndrome; describe the diagnostic criteria for syndromes associated with malnutrition and disordered eating.
20. Explain the nutritional basis for the major chronic and metabolic conditions and diseases such as obesity, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, diabetes, PKU, and anemias.
21.Describe the consequences of disease on human nutritional requirements.
22. Describe common biochemical and clinical features of nutritional disorders; and list strategies for the management of conditions or disease states with a nutritional component.
23. Describe the effectiveness (or associated damage) of interventions for conditions or diseases with a nutritional basis.

SFM-Immunology (IM)

24. List the components of the immune system; define the differences between innate and adaptive immunity and discuss their function in defense against infections.
25. Describe the activation and regulation of the immune response.
26. Describe the cellular and molecular basis of the immune response.
27. Describe the roles of the immune system in both maintaining health and contributing to disease.

SFM-Genetics (G)

28. Describe the structure and function of genes and the organization of the human genome.
29. Explain the chromosomal basis of inheritance and how alterations in chromosome number or structure may arise during mitosis and meiosis, and describe the main modes of Mendelian and non-Mendelian inheritance.
30. Perform pedigree analysis and apply principles of Mendelian inheritance in calculating genetic risk for a variety of genetic disorders and patterns of inheritance; and incorporate knowledge of population genetics to calculate genetic risk based on carrier frequency within a population.
31. Explain the nature of mutations and premutations and how they contribute to human variability and disease; identify the clinical presentation and etiology of genetic disorders including: single gene disorders, disorders of chromosome abnormalities, inborn errors of metabolism, multifactorial genetic disorders and cancer genetics, and list classification and etiolology of morphological defects.
32. Explain and identify non-Mendelian mechanisms such as: incomplete penetrance, variation in expression, uniparental disomy, epigenetics, mosaicism, new mutations, genomic imprinting and unstable repeat expansion.
33. Describe common molecular, cytogenetic and biochemical diagnostic techniques and how they are applied to genetic disorders and improvement of public health; and recognize features in a patient's medical history, physical examination or laboratory investigations that suggest the presence of genetic disease.
34. Describe an approach to the analysis of ethical dilemmas using major ethics principles.
35. Demonstrate effective communication, life-long learning, professionalism, and the ability to work collaboratively in small groups.

SFM-Pharmacology/Toxicology (PT)

36. List and describe the fundamental pharmacological properties of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics.
37. Explain how to use drug-specific and patient-specific pharmacokinetic parameters to calculate the physiochemical properties that influence rates of drug disposition and clearance in the body.
38. Describe the process by which new drugs are discovered, developed, tested and approved for use in the clinic, and discuss major ethical dilemmas that underlie drug deveopment and approval.
39. Describe the major components and organization of the autonomic nervous system.
40. Describe the clinical signs and symptoms of overdoses and exposures to drugs/toxins that act upon the autonomic nervous system and apply basic principles of toxicology to determine appropriate treatment options.

BIOL3643 IMS-I Histology examines the microarchitecture of the body, or the organization of cells to form organs. Understanding the normal microanatomy of the body is essential when later studying disease processes, clinical presentations of disease, and treatment of disease via mechanical or pharmaceutical interventions. The course consists of four blocks of core topics in the 1st semester of medical school. It begins with the function and structure of the cell, followed by the structure and function of the four basic tissue types (epithelium, connective tissue, muscle, and nerve), and then focuses on how these contribute to the functional anatomy of each organ and system. The course emphasizes characteristic developmental, structure-function, and regulatory relationships within normal cells and tissues, which are the foundation for the understanding of pathologic alteration. Course material builds sequentially upon prior knowledge and is closely integrated with the other IMS-I courses (including BIOL3644 Human Anatomy I and BIOL3642 SFM). The course format includes lectures, small group laboratory sessions (including use of light and digital microscopy), and online asynchronous learning modules.

Assessment Methods Grade Composition
Exams (4 total) 100%
Student Performance Evaluation (SPE) Formative
Attendance and participation in labs Required

Objectives

  1. Identify the morphologic features and functions of structures and organelles found in all cells
  2. Identify the cellular and tissue-level features that distinguish the following basic tissue types: epithelium, connective tissue, muscle, and nerve.
  3. Recognize the unique cell types that contribute to the microarchitecture of each tissue/organ in the body.
  4. Describe the embryologic origin and development of normal tissues/organs.
  5. Correlate different cell types to their physiologic functions in each organ (i.e. describe structure-function relationships).
  6. Identify specific prototype examples of disruptions of normal structure/function in each tissue/organ system that may result in disease states.
  7. Use microcopy to recognize and describe normal tissue structure and function that form the basis for understanding disease states. 
  8. Demonstrate effective communication, lifelong learning, professionalism, and the ability to work collaboratively in small groups.

BIOL3644 IMS-I Human Anatomy I is a 1st semester medical school course that examines the gross anatomy of the major body cavities; thorax, abdomen, and pelvis. Introductory lectures and online asynchronous learning modules in the first block of the course cover the overall organization of the body plan, the organization and functions of the cardiovascular and nervous systems, and the embryology of the germ layers and their derivatives. Subsequent blocks are organized by region; thorax, abdomen, and pelvis. Each of these blocks includes lectures on the anatomy, function (introductory physiology), and developmental anatomy (introductory embryology) of the region. Laboratory sessions in each block are focused on the dissection and detailed anatomy of the region, and also include: a prosection (teaching dissection) that presents the main anatomy of the region prior to the first lab session, an imaging module that correlates the gross anatomy in the lab with x-ray and CT imaging, and anatomical-clinical correlations. During each block a pathologist from the histology course (BIOL3643) comes to lab and takes tissue samples from pathologies found in the cadavers. Those samples are processed and presented to the students during a subsequent lab session. There are also lab sessions that include small-group sessions with gerontologists, who focus on the differences between normal aging of the body versus pathology, and the effect those pathologies likely had on the donor. Each block ends with sessions that include a team-based review of the lecture material from that block, and a practice practical lab exam. As much as possible, the anatomy course material is integrated with other courses the students are taking, especially Histology and SFM. 

Assessment Methods Grade Composition
Exams, including lab practical exams (4 written exams, 3 practical exams) 97%
Peer-Peer feedback 3%
Student Performance Evaluation (SPE) Formative
Attendance and participation in labs Required

Course Objectives

  1. Identify normal anatomical structures in adults using drawings, fixed images, prosection, and dissection.
  2. Identify the spatial and functional relationships of normal anatomical structures in adults.
  3. Describe the embryological development of organs and tissues throughout the body.
  4. Describe the basic functional anatomy (physiology) of key systems of the body.
  5. Identify anatomic structures using radiologic modalities including X-rays, CT scans and MRI-based images.
  6. Describe how changes in normal structure/function and trauma can result in disease states and pathology.
  7. Describe how disruptions in normal embryologic development can result in disease states.
  8. Describe the role of geriatricians in practice, and describe the effects of aging on the human body.
  9. Demonstrate effective communication, lifelong learning, professionalism, and the ability to work collaboratively in laboratory groups.
  10. Provide feedback to peers that is both professional and helpful, using the peer-to-peer feedback system; Accept feedback from peers in a manner that recognizes the opportunity for personal growth and improved team dynamics. 

BIOL3645 IMS-I General Pathology instructs on the fundamental causes and processes involved in the pathogenesis of major human diseases over three sequential blocks in the 1st semester of medical school. An important goal is detailed study of the cell and tissue alterations that lead to the production of disease. To uncover such alterations, morphological observations are correlated with studies involving molecular biology, biochemistry, and genetics. In studying the pathogenesis of human disease, close attention is paid to epidemiological parameters, population health, aging, and to environmental and occupational health problems. The General Pathology section of IMS-I has been integrated with other sections of IMS-I in order to maximize learning opportunities. The course format includes lectures, team-based learning exercises, and two small group laboratory sessions that utilize digital microscopy.

Assessment Methods Grade Composition
Exams (3 total) 100%
Peer-Peer feedback Formative
Attendance and participation in TBLs and labs Required

Course Objectives

 

  1. Describe the functions and roles of the field of pathology in clinical care.
  2. Describe the normal processes of cellular adaptation and responses to cell and tissue injury. 
  3. Acquire standard vocabulary to name, recognize, and classify disease processes. 
  4. Describe the underlying pathophysiologic basis for major pathologic processes such as cell injury, inflammation, disorders of hemostasis, hypersensitivity reactions, atherosclerosis, and cancer.
  5. Identify the cellular and tissue morphologic consequences of these major pathologic processes. 
  6. Describe the health and population consequences of these major pathologic processes. 
  7. Describe the mechanisms by which environmental agents and other toxicants exert their effects on cells, tissues, individual health, and populations. 
  8. Outline diagnostic approaches to these major processes based upon an understanding of the underlying pathophysiology.
  9. Outline therapeutic approaches to these major processes based upon an understanding of the underlying pathophysiology.
  10. Identify pathologic changes using virtual microscopy in pathology laboratory sessions. 
  11. Demonstrate effective communication, lifelong learning, professionalism, and the ability to work collaboratively in small groups. 
  12. Provide feedback to peers that is both professional and helpful, using the peer-to-peer feedback system. Accept feedback from peers in a manner that recognizes the opportunity for personal growth and improved team dynamics.

BIOL3656 IMS-I Health Systems Science takes a broad look at the multiple complex social, environmental and systems factors that impact human health and healthcare in the US. During this time of rapid changes in the American healthcare system, HSS provides vital foundational knowledge essential for the future practice of medicine, regardless of ultimate specialty choice. In addition to addressing important topics such as causes of health disparities and structural determinants of health, this course provides students with a foundation in health policy, epidemiology and biostatistics, as well as an introduction to quality improvement science.  The course is delivered through a combination of lecture, small group discussion and case studies, as well as a flipped classroom model with pre-assigned readings and completion of asynchronous online assignments as well as verbal and written reflection components.

Assessment Methods Grade Composition
HSS reflective essays (2) and legislative testimony (1) 30% (3 assignments, 10% each)
Student Performance Evaluation (SPE) 15%
Exam questions 40%
IHI modules 5%
Epi self-directed learning assignments (2) 5% (2 assignments, 2.5% each)
Completion of analysis of dataset 5%
Attendance at small group, workshops, selected lectures Required

Course Objectives

  1. Define health and healthcare disparities.
  2. Discuss the role of social, economic, environmental, cultural and population-level determinants of health on the health status and health care of individuals and populations.
  3. Describe the impact of laws and policies on access to care for vulnerable patients, population health outcomes, and health disparities
  4. Analyze the role of health care organizations, government agencies and programs, and NGOs in promoting and improving patient and population health
  5. Articulate strategies for identifying, accessing and working with community partners to improve patient and population health.
  6. Identify opportunities for community engagement strategies that may be used to improve the health of communities and reduce health disparities.
  7. Describe the role of the physician in the development of community health, population health and prevention strategies and in advocating for patients and communities.
  8. Describe the role of implicit and explicit bias in clinical care.
  9. Describe the impact of using race/ethnicity categories on research studies and clinical care, structural inequalities, and discrimination/biases.
  10. Apply the scientific method, including basic biostatistical and epidemiologic principles (such as study design, measures of disease frequency and measures of disease association) to answer a clinical or research question.
  11. Interpret basic statistical data in the analysis of problems ets and journal publications, and assess the validity of scientific literature. 
  12. Describe the use of the scientific method in translational research, including ethical considerations. 
  13. Identify the application and uses of bioinformatics in research and clinical care. 
  14. Use a reduced data set to identify a research question based on relevant data, conduct a simple statistical analysis, and interpret and communicate the results.
  15. Use self-directed learning techniques to formulate a clinical question and answer the question based upon principles of health systems science and individual learning needs. 
  16. Describe the basic principles of quality improvement and patient safety. 
  17. Demonstrate effective written communication in reflective essays and assignments.
  18. Demonstrates the application of health systems science principles to address health and disease on a population level.
  19. Demonstrate effective communication, lifelong learning, professionalism, and the ability to work collaboratively in small groups.
  20. Apply ethical principles to the care of patients using case studies.

Integrated Medical Sciences II

BIOL3652 IMS-II Brain Sciences is an integrated inter-disciplinary course that includes neurobiology, neuropathophysiology, neuropathology, psychiatry, and neuropharmacology. The course material is presented in an integrated fashion across three blocks of the 2nd semester of medical school. The intent of the course is to integrate neurobiology and neuroanatomy into the diagnosis and management of diseases of the nervous system. Course leaders from each of these disciplines have worked closely together to present the material in a logical and cohesive manner. Course material is closely integrated with the head and neck portion of Anatomy II, as well as the Doctoring course, in which students learn the neurologic and otolaryngologic exams. The course format includes lectures, small group case-based sessions, patient and clinicopathological (CPC) presentations, a simulation experience, and an online asynchronous component.

Assessment Methods Grade Composition
Exams (3 total) 100%
Student Performance Evaluation (SPE) Formative
Attendance at small group sessions and patient presentations Required

Course Objectives

  1. Describe the embryologic development and organization of the brain and spinal cord.
  2. Identify important gross and histological structures of the brain and spinal cord on anatomic models, cross-sections, histologic images, and neuroimaging examinations, and correlate struture with function. 
  3. Describe the important functional neural systems and pathways of the central and peripheral nervous systems. 
  4. Apply knowledge of the major structure and functions of the central and peripheral nervous systems to clinical localization of neurologic dysfunction.
  5. Describe the histopathology, pathophysiology, prevention, diagnosis and treatment of major afflictions of the central and peripheral nervous systems.
  6. Describe the structure and function of visual structures and pathways. 
  7. Identify common ophthalmologic abnormalities including clinical features, diagnostic testing, and treatment options. 
  8. Describe the structure and function of the auditory and vestibular pathways.
  9. Identify common clinical problems affecting the auditory and vestibular pathways including clinical features, diagnostic testing, and treatment options. 
  10. Describe the neural organization of key functional brain stystems that regulate cognition, emotion, and behavior.
  11. Identify the anatomy, neurochemistry, and brain imaging findings that underlie brain and behavior relationships.
  12. Describe the gene-by-environment interactions that contribute to psychopathology.
  13. Describe the diagnosis and treatment of the major syndromes in psychiatry. 
  14. Frame psychiatric care within the context of medicla and neurologic practice, including a focus on the continuum between brain, body, and behavior processes.
  15. Describe normal and atypical childhood development. 
  16. Describe the presentation, natural course, pathophysiology, prevention, diagnosis and treatment of the most common childhood neurologic and psychiatric disorders. 
  17. Demonstrate effective communication, lifelong learning, professionalism, and the ability to work collaboratively in small groups.
  18. Demonstrate appropriate application of basic science principles to the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of patients using cases.
  19. Use available information and evidence-based literature to create an appropriate differential diagnosis and treatment plan.
  20. Apply ethical principles to the care of patients using case studies.

BIOL3655 IMS-II Human Anatomy II is a 2ndsemester medical school course that follows BIOL3644 Human Anatomy I and examines the gross anatomy of the head (during IMS-II, Block I) and extremities (during IMS-II, Block 4 (Supporting Structures).  Gross head anatomy is integrated with a more detailed treatment of the CNS by the first block of the brain science course (IMS-II, Block I), and includes lectures on the overall organization, development, and function of the CNS, the meninges, the cranial nerves, and the functional anatomy of the oral cavity, larynx, and pharynx. Laboratory sessions focus on dissection of the face, orbit, oral and nasal cavities, pharynx and larynx. A group of gerontologists visits the lab after the brain has been removed to assist the students as they search for obvious, gross signs of disease. One lab session is dedicated to sectioning the brain, in concert with a rotating group of neuroscientists, neurologists, pathologists, and neurosurgeons. The anatomy imaging module in this block consists of MRI images of the head in horizontal and coronal section. There are two lectures in the extremities block. These lectures stress the overall organization and functions of the limbs, and include a detailed examination of the brachial plexus, and a focus on the compartments of the limbs as organizing principles. Lab is built around a robust peer-peer teaching experience. Each lab table (4-5 students) works on a specific region of the limb, with a focus on a common clinical problem they have been assigned. Each table then presents the anatomy of the region, and the causes, consequences and treatments of those clinical correlations to their peers. Both blocks end with sessions that include a team-based review and a practice practical lab exam.

Assessment Methods Grade Composition
Exams, including practicals (2 total exams including practicals) 90%
Student presentations on prosections 10%
Student Performance Evaluation (SPE) Formative

Course Objectives

  1. Identify normal anatomical structures in adults using drawings, fixed images, prosection, and dissection.
  2. Identify the spatial and functional relationships of normal anatomical structures in adults.
  3. Describe the embryological development of organs and tissues throughout the body.
  4. Describe the basic functional anatomy (physiology) of key systems of the body.
  5. Identify anatomic structures using radiologic modalities including X-rays, CT scans and MRI-based images.
  6. Describe how changes in normal structure/function and trauma can result in disease states and pathology.
  7. Describe how disruptions in normal embryologic development can result in disease states.
  8. Prepare and deliver an oral presentation and prosection demonstration to peers using a self-directed learning approach in consulting the literature.
  9. Demonstrate effective communication, lifelong learning, professionalism, and the ability to work collaboratively in laboratory groups.

BIOL3665: IMS-II: Supporting Structures is an integrated cross-disciplinary course that incorporates Orthopedics, Rheumatology and Dermatology. It is divided into 2 blocks – the 1st  block integrates orthopedics and rheumatology alongside musculoskeletal anatomy (in Anatomy II) and the clinical musculoskeletal exam as part of Doctoring. The Rheumatology portion of the course examines the pathophysiology, pathology, clinical manifestations, and treatment of the common types of arthritis, vasculitis, inflammatory myopathy, and systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases. The goal of the Orthopedics section is to explore the relationship between normal musculoskeletal structure and function and the pathophysiology that results when structures are injured or diseased and to provide an early medical school exposure to some of the Orthopedic surgical techniques and technologies used to return function. The 2nd portion of the course, Dermatology, follows the Microbiology/Infectious Diseases course. The Dermatology portion of the course introduces students to the full skin exam, identification of common dermatologic lesions, dermatologic complications of treatment, and dermatologic emergencies with a focus on the underlying pathophysiologic basis for these disorders.  The course format includes lectures, patient presentations, and a clinical skills dermatologic examination session.

Assessment Methods Grade Composition
Exams (2 total) 100%
Attendance at dermatology patient evaluations Required

Course Objectives

  1. Describe the relationship between normal musculoskeletal structure and function.
  2. Describe the risk factors, pathogenesis, pathophysiology, pathologic findings, and consequences of common musculoskeletal disorders and injuries.
  3. Describe the risk factors, pathogenesis, pathophysiology, pathologic findings, and consequences of common rheumatologic and dermatologic disorders.
  4. Recognize the clinical manifestations of common orthopedic, rheumatologic, and dermatologic disorders.
  5. Perform a full-skin exam to identify common dermatologic lesions.
  6. Identify and interpret laboratory and clinical tests used for the diagnosis of rheumatologic, orthopedic, and dermatologic disorders.
  7. Outline the therapeutic approach to common orthopedic, rheumatologic, and dermatologic disorders.
  8. Describe the indications, risks, and benefits of available treatment options for orthopedic, rheumatologic, and dermatologic disorders.

BIOL3653: IMS-II: Microbiology/Infectious Diseases is an integrated 2nd semester medical school course that introduces the basic biological principles, pathogenesis and host response, disease presentation, epidemiology, control and treatment of parasites, viruses, fungi and bacteria that cause human disease. Emphasis is placed on a subset of the most clinically significant and best characterized pathogens in each group. The Microbiology component of the course provides a foundation in the characteristics of disease-causing microorganisms (physiology, growth, structure, genetics, life cycles), mechanisms and routes of transmission, immunity, and the mechanisms by which specific microbial pathogens cause disease, with emphasis on unique properties, identification, virulence determinants, and host damage. Traditional and modern diagnostic methods in microbiology are also introduced. Microbial disease states in multiple organ systems are addressed in the Infectious Disease component of the course. Focus is given to common infectious disease syndromes and their clinical presentation, prevention, and diagnostic strategies among children, adults, elderly and the immunocompromised. The course format includes lectures, small group case studies, two wet-lab experiences, team-based learning exercises, and patient presentations.

Assessment Methods Grade Composition
Exams (2 total) 100%
Student Performance Evaluation (SPE) Formative
Attendance and participation in TBLs, wet labs, and patient presentations Required

Course Objectives

  1. Explain innate and adaptive immune responses, and the effector mechanisms of immune defense.
  2. Describe how pathogens are recognized and presented to the immune system; and relate these immune mechanisms to the infectious disease process and the prevention and control of infectious disease.
  3. Define pathogenicity and virulence and the relationship between the pathogen and the host.
  4. Describe the disease process for each major group of pathogens (virus, fungi, parasites, bacteria), including portals of entry; establishment of infection; evasion of host defenses; and damage to the host.
  5. List the reservoirs of infectious organisms and describe how each major disease is acquired (modes of transmission), including the epidemiological factors that affect transmission, and the role of a compromised immune system in the infectious process (susceptibility).
  6. List and describe the internal and external structures and arrangement of bacterial cells, and describe how the structures assist in the infection and disease process.
  7. Describe the requirements, characteristics and clinical implications of bacterial growth.
  8. List and describe the pathogenic determinants of bacterial disease (toxins; factors aiding in invasiveness, pathogenicity or immune evasion; and obligate and intracellular growth).
  9. Describe the basic features of bacterial genomes and genetic mechanisms such as mutation, recombination, phage transduction, and transfer of DNA between cells, and discuss the clinical significance of these mechanisms.
  10. Describe the structure, classification, infection cycle and biosynthesis (replication) of viruses.
  11. Define and describe viral genetic mechanisms such as mutation, recombination, reassortment, complementation, and phenotypic mixing in infected cells, and discuss the clinical significance of these mechanisms.
  12. List the bacterial and viral pathogens of major importance and describe the mechanisms by which they cause prominent infectious disease syndromes.
  13. Describe common bacterial and virus disease syndromes and their epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, treatment and prevention.
  14. Describe the basic morphology and growth of fungi (hyphae, yeast, dimorphic, various conidia), and the function of fungal cell structures in the disease process.
  15. List and describe the affected populations, modes of transmission, symptoms and clinical manifestations of diseases caused by fungi, yeast and molds, including the major mechanisms by which they cause tissue damage, and the classification of human mycoses.
  16. List and describe key features of parasite classes, including the life cycles of major parasitic pathogens (protozoa, helminths).
  17. List and describe the epidemiology, risk factors, transmission, specific infectious disease syndromes and their clinical presentation, and long-term complications of parasites.
  18. Describe the major classes of antimicrobial agents, including antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, and antiparasitic drugs, and describe their mechanisms of action, and mechanisms of acquired resistance; and describe the properites of microbial vaccines. 
  19. Discuss the clinical importance of antibiotic resistance and control of resistant organisms.
  20. Identify the risk factors and their role in the pathogenesis and epidemiology of infectious disease; and recognize the signs, symptoms, and complications of infection. 
  21. Describe diagnostic approaches as part of a management plan that includes specific therapy (if available) as well as infection prevention and public health measures including use of vaccination or other infectious disease control measures. 
  22. Describe the health and population consequences of major pathogens.
  23. Describe how morphology, metabolism or antigenic structure aids in recognition of pathogens by the clinical laboratory.
  24. Describe the skills for laboratory staining for detection of microbes in clinical specimens.
  25. Demonstrate effective communication, lifelong learning, professionalism, and the ability to work collaboratively in small groups.
  26. Demonstrate appropriate application of basic science principles to the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of patients using cases. 
  27. Use available information and evidence-based literature to create an appropriate differential diagnosis and treatment plan. 
  28. Apply ethical principles to the care of patients using case studies.

Year 2

Integrated Medical Sciences III

BIOL3662 IMS-III Cardiovascular is 2nd year medical school course that provides a comprehensive understanding of the physiology, pathophysiology, pathology and pharmacology of the cardiovascular system. Emphasis is placed on learning the normal cardiovascular physiology and then building on this foundation to describe the pathophysiology, pathology, and pharmacology of common disease conditions that affect the cardiovascular system, such as valve disease, heart failure, ischemic injury, arrhythmias, and congenital conditions. The course format includes lectures, small group case-based sessions, a hands-on ultrasound session focused on echocardiography, and pathology labs.

Assessment Methods Grade Composition
Quiz 5%
Exam 95%
Student Performance Evaluation (SPE) Formative
Attendance in small group sessions Required

Course Objectives

  1. Describe normal histology, embryologic development, and cardiovascular anatomy.
  2. Describe normal cardiovascular physiology.
  3. Describe the risk factors, pathogenesis, pathophysiology, pathologic findings, and consequences of common cardiovascular disorders.
  4. Recognize the clinical manifestations of common cardiovascular disorders.
  5. Describe the long-term consequences of common cardiovascular disorders.
  6. Identify and interpret laboratory tests used for the diagnosis of cardiovascular disorders.
  7. Outline the diagnostic and therapeutic approach to common cardiovascular problems.
  8. Discuss the indications for, risks, and benefits of available treatment options for cardiovascular disorders.
  9. Demonstrate effective communication, lifelong learning,  professionalism, and the ability to work collaboratively in small groups.
  10. Demonstrate appropriate application of basic science principles to the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of patients using cases.
  11. Use available information and evidence-based literature to create an appropriate differential diagnosis and treatment plan.
  12. Apply ethical principles to the care of patients using case studies.
  13. Demonstrate the proper ultrasound techniques to identify the normal structures of the heart.

Small group session-level objectives

  1. Use verbal, nonverbal, and listening skills effectively
  2. Demonstrate the ability to work collaboratively
  3. Logically and accurately apply basic scientific principles and concepts in evaluating, identifying, treating, and preventing illness
  4. Use available information and evidence-based literature to create an appropriate differential diagnosis and treatment plan.
  5. Demonstrate an active interest in learning and independently seek to close knowledge gaps
  6. Attend small group sessions in a consistent and timely manner, and demonstrate honesty and respect for peers and faculty 
  7. Identify salient principles of medical ethics
     

BIOL 3663 IMS-III Pulmonary is a 2nd year medical school course that provides a comprehensive understanding of the physiology, pathophysiology, pathology and pharmacology of the pulmonary system. Emphasis is placed on learning the normal pulmonary physiology and then building on this foundation to describe the pathophysiology, pathology, and pharmacology of common disease conditions that affect the pulmonary system, including obstructive and restrictive lung diseases, reactive airway diseases, respiratory failure, lung infections, lung malignancies, pulmonary hypertension and pulmonary embolism. The course format includes lectures, small group case-based sessions, and a hands-on ultrasound session focused on major vessels and the pulmonary window, and pathology labs.

Assessment Methods Grade Composition
Quiz 5%
Exam 95%
Student Performance Evaluation (SPE) Formative
Attendance in small group sessions Required

Course Objectives

  1. Describe normal histology, embryologic development, and pulmonary anatomy.
  2. Describe normal pulmonary physiology.
  3. Describe the risk factors, pathogenesis, pathophysiology, pathologic findings, and consequences of common pulmonary disorders.
  4. Recognize the clinical manifestations of common pulmonary disorders.
  5. Describe the long-term consequences of common pulmonary disorders.
  6. Identify and interpret laboratory tests used for the diagnosis of pulmonary disorders.
  7. Outline the diagnostic and therapeutic approach to common pulmonary problems.
  8. Discuss the indications for, risks, and benefits of available treatment options for pulmonary disorders.
  9. Demonstrate effective communication, lifelong learning,  professionalism, and the ability to work collaboratively in small groups.
  10. Demonstrate appropriate application of basic science principles to the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of patients using cases.
  11. Use available information and evidence-based literature to create an appropriate differential diagnosis and treatment plan.
  12. Apply ethical principles to the care of patients using case studies.
  13. Demonstrate the proper ultrasound techniques to identify the normal structures of the lungs and neck vessels.

Small group session-level objectives

  1. Use verbal, nonverbal, and listening skills effectively
  2. Demonstrate the ability to work collaboratively
  3. Logically and accurately apply basic scientific principles and concepts in evaluating, identifying, treating, and preventing illness
  4. Use available information and evidence-based literature to create an appropriate differential diagnosis and treatment plan.
  5. Demonstrate an active interest in learning and independently seek to close knowledge gaps
  6. Attend small group sessions in a consistent and timely manner, and demonstrate honesty and respect for peers and faculty 
  7. Identify salient principles of medical ethics
     

BIOL 3664 IMS-III Renal is a 2nd year medical school course that provides a comprehensive understanding of the physiology, pathophysiology, pathology and pharmacology of the renal system. Emphasis is placed on learning the normal renal physiology and then building on this foundation to describe the pathophysiology, pathology, and pharmacology of common disease conditions that affect the renal system, including glomerular and tubular injuries, electrolyte abnormalities, obstructive renal disease, and acute and chronic kidney disease. The course format includes lectures, small group case-based and team-based learning sessions, and a hands-on ultrasound session on the abdomen.

Assessment Methods Grade Composition
Quiz 5%
Exam 90%
Student Performance Evaluation (SPE) 5%
Attendance in small group sessions Required

Course Objectives

  1. Describe normal histology, embryologic development, and renal anatomy.
  2. Describe normal renal physiology.
  3. Describe the risk factors, pathogenesis, pathophysiology, pathologic findings, and consequences of common renal disorders.
  4. Recognize the clinical manifestations of common renal disorders.
  5. Describe the long-term consequences of common renal disorders.
  6. Identify and interpret laboratory tests used for the diagnosis of renal disorders.
  7. Outline the diagnostic and therapeutic approach to common renal problems.
  8. Discuss the indications for, risks, and benefits of available treatment options for renal disorders.
  9. Demonstrate effective communication, lifelong learning,  professionalism, and the ability to work collaboratively in small groups.
  10. Demonstrate appropriate application of basic science principles to the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of patients using cases.
  11. Use available information and evidence-based literature to create an appropriate differential diagnosis and treatment plan.
  12. Apply ethical principles to the care of patients using case studies.
  13. Demonstrate the proper ultrasound techniques to identify the normal structures of the liver, kidneys, and major blood vessels of the abdomen.

Small group session-level objectives

  1. Use verbal, nonverbal, and listening skills effectively
  2. Demonstrate the ability to work collaboratively
  3. Logically and accurately apply basic scientific principles and concepts in evaluating, identifying, treating, and preventing illness
  4. Demonstrate an active interest in learning and independently seek to close knowledge gaps
  5. Attend small group sessions in a consistent and timely manner, and demonstrate honesty and respect for peers and faculty 
  6. Identify salient principles of medical ethics
  7. Use available information and evidence-based literature to create an appropriate differential diagnosis and treatment plan.

 

BIOL 3654 IMS-III Endocrine Sciences is a 2nd year medical school course that provides a comprehensive understanding of the physiology, pathophysiology, pathology and pharmacology of the endocrine system. Emphasis is placed on learning the normal endocrine physiology and then building on this foundation to describe the pathophysiology, pathology, and pharmacology of common disease conditions that affect the endocrine system, including pituitary, adrenal, and thyroid disorders, diabetes, and calcium and bone disorders. The course format includes lectures, small group case-based sessions, and a hands-on ultrasound session focused on the thyroid.

Assessment Methods Grade Composition
Exam 100%
Student Performance Evaluation (SPE) Formative
Attendance in small group sessions Required

Course Objectives

 

  1. Describe normal histology, embryologic development, and endocrine anatomy.
  2. Describe normal endocrine physiology, including normal feedback mechanisms.
  3. Describe the risk factors, pathogenesis, pathophysiology, pathologic findings, and consequences of common endocrine disorders.
  4. Recognize the clinical manifestations of common endocrine disorders.
  5. Describe the long-term consequences of common endocrine disorders.
  6. Identify and interpret laboratory tests used for the diagnosis of endocrine disorders.
  7. Outline the diagnostic and therapeutic approach to common endocrine problems.
  8. Discuss the indications for, risks, and benefits of available treatment options for endocrine disorders.
  9. Demonstrate effective communication, lifelong learning,  professionalism, and the ability to work collaboratively in small groups.
  10. Demonstrate appropriate application of basic science principles to the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of patients using cases.
  11. Use available information and evidence-based literature to create an appropriate differential diagnosis and treatment plan.
  12. Apply ethical principles to the care of patients using case studies.
  13. Demonstrate the proper ultrasound techniques to identify the normal structures of the thyroid gland and neck.

Small group session-level objectives

 

  1. Use verbal, nonverbal, and listening skills effectively
  2. Demonstrate the ability to work collaboratively
  3. Logically and accurately apply basic scientific principles and concepts in evaluating, identifying, treating, and preventing illness
  4. Demonstrate an active interest in learning and independently seek to close knowledge gaps
  5. Attend small group sessions in a consistent and timely manner, and demonstrate honesty and respect for peers and faculty 
  6. Identify salient principles of medical ethics
  7. Use available information and evidence-based literature to create an appropriate differential diagnosis and treatment plan.
     

BIOL 3674 IMS-III Human Reproduction is a 2nd year medical school course that provides a comprehensive understanding of the physiology, pathophysiology, pathology and pharmacology of the reproductive system. The central mission of the course is to provide an introduction to the human reproduction system in preparation for the 3rd year Obstetrics and Gynecology clerkship. Emphasis is placed on learning the normal physiology of the reproductive system and then building on this foundation to describe the pathophysiology, pathology, and pharmacology of common disease conditions that affect the reproductive system, including sexually transmitted infections, breast, gynecological, and prostate malignancies, problems with pregnancy, infertility, and sexual dysfunction. The course format includes lectures, small group case-based sessions, and a hands-on workshop including simulation elements.

Assessment Methods Grade Composition
Exam 100%
Student Performance Evaluation (SPE) Formative
Attendance in small group sessions Required

Course Objectives

  1. Describe normal histology, embryologic development, and reproductive anatomy.
  2. Describe normal reproductive physiology, including normal feedback mechanisms.
  3. Describe the risk factors, pathogenesis, pathophysiology, pathologic findings, and consequences of common reproductive disorders.
  4. Recognize the clinical manifestations of common reproductive disorders.
  5. Describe the long-term consequences of common reproductive disorders.
  6. Identify and interpret laboratory tests used for the diagnosis of reproductive disorders.
  7. Outline the diagnostic and therapeutic approach to common reproductive problems.
  8. Discuss the indications for, risks, and benefits of available treatment options for reproductive disorders.
  9. Demonstrate effective communication, lifelong learning,  professionalism, and the ability to work collaboratively in small groups.
  10. Demonstrate appropriate application of basic science principles to the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of patients using cases.
  11. Use available information and evidence-based literature to create an appropriate differential diagnosis and treatment plan.
  12. Apply ethical principles to the care of patients using case studies.
  13. Demonstrate the proper ultrasound techniques to identify the normal structures of the pelvis.

Small group session-level objectives

  1. Use verbal, nonverbal, and listening skills effectively
  2. Demonstrate the ability to work collaboratively
  3. Logically and accurately apply basic scientific principles and concepts in evaluating, identifying, treating, and preventing illness
  4. Demonstrate an active interest in learning and independently seek to close knowledge gaps
  5. Attend small group sessions in a consistent and timely manner, and demonstrate honesty and respect for peers and faculty 
  6. Identify salient principles of medical ethics
  7. Use available information and evidence-based literature to create an appropriate differential diagnosis and treatment plan.

Integrated Medical Sciences IV

BIOL3672 IMS-IV Hematology is an integrated  2nd year medical school course that is organized into several major sections including normal and abnormal hematopoiesis, disorders of white blood cells, anemias and other disorders of red blood cells, normal coagulation and disorders of hemostasis and hypercoagulability, malignant hematology, transfusion medicine, and pharmacological approaches to the management of hematologic disorders. The course format includes lectures, small group case-based sessions, and an asynchronous online learning module.

Assessment Methods Grade Composition
Exam 100%
Student Performance Evaluation (SPE) Formative
Attendance in small group sessions Required

Course Objectives

  1. Describe normal hematopoiesis, heme and hemoglobin synthesis, and coagulation.
  2. Describe the risk factors, pathogenesis, pathophysiology, pathologic findings, and consequences of common hematologic disorders.
  3. Recognize the clinical manifestations of common hematologic disorders.
  4. Describe the long-term consequences of common hematologic disorders.
  5. Identify and interpret laboratory tests used for the diagnosis of hematologic disorders.
  6. Outline the diagnostic and therapeutic approach to common hematologic disorders.
  7. Describe the indications, risks, and benefits of available treatment options for hematologic disorders.
  8. Demonstrate effective communication, lifelong learning, professionalism, and the ability to work collaboratively in small groups.
  9. Demonstrate appropriate application of basic science principles to the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of patients using cases. 
  10. Use available information and evidence-based literature to create an appropriate differential diagnosis and treatment plan. 
  11. Apply ethical principles to the care of patients using case studies.
     

BIOL3673 IMS-IV Gastroenterology is a 2nd year medical school course that provides a comprehensive understanding of the physiology, pathophysiology, pathology and pharmacology of the gastrointestinal system. Emphasis is placed on learning the normal gastrointestinal physiology and then building on this foundation to describe the pathophysiology, pathology, and pharmacology of common disease conditions that affect the gastrointestinal system, including esophageal diseases, peptic ulcer disease, inflammatory bowel diseases, biliary disease, acute and chronic liver diseases, and malignancies of the gastrointestinal system. The course format includes lectures and small group case-based sessions.

Assessment Methods Grade Composition
Exam 100%
Student Performance Evaluation (SPE) Formative
Attendance in small group sessions Required

Course Objectives

  1. Describe normal histology, embryologic development, and gastrointestinal, biliary, and liver anatomy.
  2. Describe normal gastrointestinal, biliary, and liver physiology.
  3. Describe the risk factors, pathogenesis, pathophysiology, and pathologic findings, and consequences of common gastrointestinal, biliary, and liver disorders.
  4. Recognize the clinical manifestations of common gastrointestinal, biliary, and liver disorders.
  5. Describe the long-term consequences of common gastrointestinal, biliary, and liver disorders.
  6. Identify and interpret laboratory tests used for the diagnosis of gastrointestinal, biliary, and liver disorders.
  7. Outline the diagnostic and therapeutic approach to common gastrointestinal, biliary, and liver problems.
  8. Discuss the indications for, risks, and benefits of available treatment options for gastrointestinal, biliary, and liver disorders.
  9. Demonstrate effective communication, lifelong learning, application of basic science principles to clinical decision making, and professionalism in small groups.
  10. Demonstrate appropriate application of basic science principles to the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of patients using cases.
  11. Use available information and evidence-based literature to create an appropriate differential diagnosis and treatment plan.
  12. Apply ethical principles to the care of patients using case studies.

Small group session-level objectives

  1. Use verbal, nonverbal, and listening skills effectively
  2. Demonstrate the ability to work collaboratively
  3. Logically and accurately apply basic scientific principles and concepts in evaluating, identifying, treating, and preventing illness
  4. Demonstrate an active interest in learning and independently seek to close knowledge gaps
  5. Attend small group sessions in a consistent and timely manner, and demonstrate honesty and respect for peers and faculty 
  6. Identify salient principles of medical ethics
  7. Use available information and evidence-based literature to create an appropriate differential diagnosis and treatment plan.